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Rise of the Planet of the Apes Trailer (2011)

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Make no mistake, I’m a huge fan of the Planet of the Apes (PotA) franchise.  HUGE.  OK, I admit that the Marky Mark remake that came out in 2001 was enjoyable when I saw it in the theater, but when I tried to watch it again, I hated it.  Really, it’s awful.  But the original 5 movies, the TV series and the animated series are all great for what they were.

So now apparently there is a new movie, Rise of the Planet of the Apes.  Seems to be a new direction and not a continuation of any of the previously released films.  An Alzheimer’s study in apes goes terribly wrong and one special ape, Caesar, gets things going.  The uprising!

I will go see this, just to satisfy curiously.  I’ll go in with low expectations and will hopefully leave at least mildly satisfied and entertained.  The trailer is below and looks alright.  Of course, like most movies these days, it’s primarily cgi, which I really wish movies would use less of, but that’s just the way it is nowadays.

The film is set to release August 5, 2011.  Let’s hope that it doesn’t suck…and that there are no sequels, no matter how good it may be.

Written by The Metal Files

April 22, 2011 at 8:45 am

The Celluloid Coffin is now open!

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My lifelong friend, CoffinDan, has finally launched his movie review blog.  This guys knows his stuff in the world of classic horror and sci-fi and has quite a collection of classic VHS tapes.  He’s a good resource if you have questions about stuff.  Add him to your blogrolls, you little monkeys!

Written by The Metal Files

April 11, 2011 at 2:56 pm

Movie Review: Last Days Here (The Story of Pentagram’s Bobby Liebling)

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Bobby Liebling is not a scary dude, but he’s been through some scary stuff.  One look at the scars on his arms and the age in his eyes and you know he’s been down some rough roads, left hand paths even.  Most people who have done meth, heroin and crack for as long as he has don’t survive.  Bobby Liebling is a survivor.

As noted in previous posts (here and here), I’ve been a Pentagram fan for 20+ years.   Finally getting to see them for the first time 2 years ago was a joy and last year’s encounter with them even better.

When I first saw that there was a documentary by 9.14 Pictures about Bobby being made and being world-premiered right here in Austin during the SxSW Festival, I was pretty excited.  Just last year I was fortunate enough to see the premier of the Lemmy movie.

I took off a few hours early for work to be able to attend the movie which was being shown at the Austin Convention Center at 4:30PM.  I go in and there are people everywhere.  The way admission works at these things is that if you have a Film Festival badge or wristband, you get automatic admission into events before those of us who choose not to purchase the credentials.  I never do.  I went to the ticket booth and they said “If there’s available seating it’ll cost $10 to see the movie.”  Sweet.  I think we paid $16 or less last year to see the Lemmy movie.

As I was waiting in the ticket purchase line, I see a long-haired dude in a leather jacket with some credentials hanging around his neck.  He was talking to someone in the next line over and I spot his name on his badge and see that he was one of the directors of the film, Demian Fenton.  He spots me and comes over and asks if I am there to see Last Days Here.  He complemented my Candlemass shirt, we spoke about the film and Pentagram for a few minutes and he left.  A few minutes later he comes back and hands me an 11” x 14” movie poster.  Awesome.

They start letting the badge holders and wristband wielders in then allow the ticket purchasers to buy a ticket and go in.   The theater was huge, bigger than I expected.  There were a few hundred seats on the floor and a few hundred more bleacher style seats.  I headed to top dead center of the bleacher seats.  My guess is that only about 75 people at the most were there.  I saw one guy in a Pentagram shirt and a few other people that I recognized from some shows around town.  Most people there were likely curious movie-goers.  Of course I feel that the turnout was pretty weak. Before the movie starts, the directors and producer were introduced and spoke for a few minutes.

The lights go down and the movie starts. The documentary begins in 2006 and you’re basically hit right off the bat seeing Bobby smoking crack.  It was painful to see.  His arms are bandaged up basically from wrist to should and his hands are swollen looking and black.  The crack and meth make him believe that he has bacteria on him that he has to pick off.  You get a long glimpse of his upper inner-bicep area where he has picked so much that it was just an open sore.  I’m not grossed out very easily but I did turn my head away from the screen for a moment.

You’re introduced to Sean “Pellet” Pelletier who was a huge Pentagram fan that basically became Bobby’s personal assistant, friend and tour manager.  You see his struggle in trying to help the band get things together to do some shows and you see the pain in his eyes from seeing his friend continually get messed up more and more from his drug use.

Bobby’s mom and dad and shown quite a bit as Bobby was living in their basement (The Sub-Basement) for much of his adult life.  His drug use has taken its toll on his parents as well.  His mom was still taking care of him, and really still enabling him.  You get a peek into what may have been a trigger for Bobby’s drug use when his dad speaks about how he wanted bigger and better things for his son (as most parents do).  His dad was apparently a pretty well-known Asst Secretary of State who worked for 3 or 4 presidents starting with Johnson.

It’s a pretty common theme for many drug users it seems.  A lot of pressure from parents to live up to their expectations and out of rebellion and maybe attention seeking, you become self-destructive…by choice.  No one forced those needles into Bobby nor did anyone force him to smoke crack.   I didn’t really get the feeling from the movie that he was being portrayed as a victim and I believe he even states that “I did this to myself.”

Later in the movie J.B. Beverley (“Like” him on Facebook) is shown quite a bit.  J.B.’s band used to play a bar that I worked in back in Virginia and when he was in town, he’d tell me whacked out stories about Bobby.  J.B. was portrayed as a good friend to Bobby in the movie.

There were some cool interviews with former members of the 70s era of the band as well as some good little segments with Joe Hasselvander and Victor Griffin.  There is some great classic footage and some of the modern footage from The Black Cat show where Bobby finally shows up with about 30 seconds left in the last song, gets kicked by the guitarist and the band walks off stage.  You also see the “comeback” footage from the 2009 Webster Hall show in NYC.

In the last few years, Bobby met a girl from Philadelphia who is about 30 years younger than him.  He moved up there from Maryland to live with her, he cleans up, looks good then things fell apart.  She left him, ended up filing a restraining order, he ends up in Jail for a few weeks etc.  Ultimately they get back together, get married and had a child together late in 2010 which is where the movie ends.  When I met Bobby last year, he seemed clean and was in very good spirits.  He seemed like a generally good natured guy who took terrible decisions.  (Review Your Choices, eh?)

Overall I think this was much better than the Lemmy movie as this really told a story.  The Lemmy movie really could’ve been titled “Hanging Out With Lemmy”, but it never really got too deep into the guy.  Last Days Here showed how drug abuse affects the user, the family and the friends.  Much of the sentiments in the movie hit “close to home” for me and there were several moments during the movie where I admittedly got choked up.  It may be a little more comparable to the Anvil movie, except this was about a better band.  They had several good chances for record deals via Colombia Records and even had Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley come down from NYC to check them out at a rehearsal, which eventually bombed.

After the movie there was a quick Q&A session and I caught up with the filmmakers in the hall to give them my thoughts and snap a quick photo with them.  They were all very gracious and I hope the 2 subsequent viewings this week go well, even better than yesterday’s.

As a Pentagram fan, I hope this movie ends up with some decent distribution.  This movie can also serve as a documentary about the damage caused by drug abuse.  I’d love to have this on DVD.  There was a full sized movie poster hanging in the hallway and I asked where I could purchase one.  Unfortunately only 2 were made so I’ll have to wait until they get some distribution before getting something like that.  I’d surely frame it and hang it up.  For now I’ll cherish the poster that they gave me and will hopefully catch one of the 2 shows that Pentagram are playing this week.

Nice work, guys.  Best of luck!

 

Bobby Liebling is not a scary dude, but he’s been through some scary stuff.  One look at the scars on his arms and the age in his eyes and you know he’s been down some rough roads, left hand paths even.  Most people who have done meth, heroin and crack for as long as he has don’t survive.  Bobby Liebling is a survivor.

As noted in previous posts (here and here), I’ve been a Pentagram fan for 20+ years.   Finally getting to see them for the first time 2 years ago was a joy and last year’s encounter with them even better.

When I first saw that there was a documentary about Bobby being made and being world-premiered right here in Austin during the SxSW Festival, I was pretty excited.  Just last year I was fortunate enough to see the premier of the Lemmy movie.

I took off a few hours early for work to be able to attend the movie which was being shown at the Austin Convention Center at 4:30PM.  I go in and there are people everywhere.  The way admission works at these things is that if you have a Film Festival badge or wristband, you get automatic admission into events before those of us who choose not to purchase the credentials.  I never do.  I went to the ticket booth and they said “If there’s available seating it’ll cost $10 to see the movie.”  Sweet.  I think we paid $16 or less last year to see the Lemmy movie.

As I was waiting in the ticket purchase line, I see a long-haired dude in a leather jacket with some credentials hanging around his neck.  He was talking to someone in the next line over and I spot his name on his badge and see that he was one of the directors of the film, Demian Fenton.  He spots me and comes over and asks if I am there to see Last Days Here.  He complemented my Candlemass shirt, we spoke about the film and Pentagram for a few minutes and he left.  A few minutes later he comes back and hands me an 11” x 14” movie poster.  Awesome.

They start letting the badge holders and wristband wielders in then allow the ticket purchasers to buy a ticket and go in.   The theater was huge, bigger than I expected.  There were a few hundred seats on the floor and a few hundred more bleacher style seats.  I headed to top dead center of the bleacher seats.  My guess is that only about 75 people at the most were there.  I saw one guy in a Pentagram shirt and a few other people that I recognized from some shows around town.  Most people there were likely curious movie-goers.  Of course I feel that the turnout was pretty weak. Before the movie starts, the directors and producer were introduced and spoke for a few minutes.

The lights go down and the movie starts. The documentary begins in 2006 and you’re basically hit right off the bat seeing Bobby smoking crack.  It was painful to see.  His arms are bandaged up basically from wrist to should and his hands are swollen looking and black.  The crack and meth make him believe that he has bacteria on him that he has to pick off.  You get a long glimpse of his upper inner-bicep area where he has picked so much that it was just an open sore.  I’m not grossed out very easily but I did turn my head away from the screen for a moment.

You’re introduced to Sean “Pellet” Pelletier who was a huge Pentagram fan that basically became Bobby’s personal assistant, friend and tour manager.  You see his struggle in trying to help the band get things together to do some shows and you see the pain in his eyes from seeing his friend continually get messed up more and more from his drug use.

Bobby’s mom and dad and shown quite a bit as Bobby was living in their basement (The Sub-Basement) for much of his adult life.  His drug use has taken its toll on his parents as well.  His mom was still taking care of him, and really still enabling him.  You get a peek into what may have been a trigger for Bobby’s drug use when his dad speaks about how he wanted bigger and better things for his son (as most parents do).  His dad was apparently a pretty well-known Asst Secretary of State who worked for 3 or 4 presidents starting with Johnson.

It’s a pretty common theme for many drug users it seems.  A lot of pressure from parents to live up to their expectations and out of rebellion and maybe attention seeking, you become self-destructive…by choice.  No one forced those needles into Bobby nor did anyone force him to smoke crack.   I didn’t really get the feeling from the movie that he was being portrayed as a victim and I believe he even states that “I did this to myself.”

Later in the movie J.B. Beverley is shown quite a bit.  J.B.’s band used to play a bar that I worked in back in Virginia and when he was in town, he’d tell me whacked out stories about Bobby.  J.B. was portrayed as a good friend to Bobby in the movie.

There were some cool interviews with former members of the 70s era of the band as well as some good little segments with Joe Hasselvander and Victor Griffin.  There is some great classic footage and some of the modern footage from The Black Cat show where Bobby finally shows up with about 30 seconds left in the last song, gets kicked by the guitarist and the band walks off stage.  You also see the “comeback” footage from the 2009 Webster Hall show in NYC.

In the last few years, Bobby met a girl from Philadelphia who is about 30 years younger than him.  He moved up there from Maryland to live with her, he cleans up, looks good then things fell apart.  She left him, ended up filing a restraining order, he ends up in Jail for a few weeks etc.  Ultimately they get back together, get married and had a child together late in 2010 which is where the movie ends.  When I met Bobby last year, he seemed clean and was in very good spirits.  He seemed like a generally good natured guy who took terrible decisions.  (Review Your Choices, eh?)

Overall I think this was much better than the Lemmy movie as this really told a story.  The Lemmy movie really could’ve been titled “Hanging Out With Lemmy”, but it never really got too deep into the guy.  Last Days Here showed how drug abuse affects the user, the family and the friends.  Much of the sentiments in the movie hit “close to home” for me and there were several moments during the movie where I admittedly got choked up.  It may be a little more comparable to the Anvil movie, except this was about a better band.  They had several good chances for record deals via Colombia Records and even had Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley come down from NYC to check them out at a rehearsal, which eventually bombed.

After the movie there was a quick Q&A session and I caught up with the filmmakers in the hall to give them my thoughts and snap a quick photo with them.  They were all very gracious and I hope the 2 subsequent viewings this week go well, even better than yesterday’s.

As a Pentagram fan, I hope this movie ends up with some decent distribution.  I’d love to have this on DVD.  There was a full sized movie poster hanging in the hallway and I asked where I could purchase one.  Unfortunately only 2 were made so I’ll have to wait until they get some distribution before getting something like that.  I’d surely frame it and hang it up.  For now I’ll cherish the poster that they gave me and will hopefully catch one of the 2 shows that Pentagram are playing this week.

Nice work, guys.  Best of luck!

SxSW 2011 Music and Film Festival

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I’m pretty fortunate to live in a town that holds a festival like this one every year.  Austin is dubbed The Live Music Capital of the World and while it’s a great place to see bands, it’s not the greatest place to be in a band.  But that’s neither here nor there for this article.

This will be the 4th SxSW festival in a row that I am attending and I always see some good bands.  For the music that I’m into, it’s only a small percentage of the 1,000 or so bands that come here from all over the world to play.  I wasn’t here for the early days of this fest where bands were really playing for their shot at a record deal, but I do find it enjoyable.

It is unfortunate, however, that many who visit Austin for SxSW treat the town like their own toilet and/or trash dump.  Sure, those who bought their passes/badges paid a lot of money for them, but that’s no excuse for poor manners and behavior.  Just my 2 cents on that.

In SxSWs past, I’ve seen Motorhead, the Lemmy movie, VoiVod (3 times last year!), and dozens of other bands of all genres just by walking the streets of downtown.  It’s pretty cool overall.

This year’s music lineup is pretty tasty for “official” shows.  It includes The Rods, Pentagram, X Japan, Saint Vitus, Christian Mistress, Agollach, Alex Skolnick Trio, Zoroaster, Naam and a slew of others.  I also always end up seeing some other good bands that I have never heard of before.  Not to mention it’s a big fun party.

I’m not the biggest moviegoer in the world, but I will make time to see Last Days Here which is a documentary about the life of legendary Pentagram singer Bobby Liebling.  I met and had dinner with Bobby and Pentagram last year and he is a really nice guy.

I’ll be posting reviews of the shows and the movie for sure.  I’m pretty excited already.

Renee Reviews stuff.

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So way back in 1987 when my first real band first got together, this beautiful girl with big hair (no offense Renee) Renee Roland small_57049_2009-06-16 10-22-42.671and her gorgeous friend Carla used to come over to our house on the farm and hang out during band practice. Realize that my band practiced in my bedroom…9pc Pearl drum set, 2 guitars, bass and sometimes a singer, a bed, a desk and a dresser in a roughly 12×12 room. It was pretty cramped in there. It was always fun having them over there because they were a lot prettier than us sausage heads.

A few years later I started working for VDOT as a surveyor. I had met him a time or 2 back in the band days when we would either go to Renee’s house to pick her up or drop her off. It was never a pleasurable experience but we won’t discuss that any further. Renee’s dad was one of the survey chiefs and ultimately the big boss of the survey department during my tenure as one of the “grubs”. He was always a cool guy. He ultimately moved into a position in the design section and I moved to utilities shortly after. It was cool because I got to work with him more closely. I knew that Renee had moved to LA some years before and had lost touch with her, but her Dad gave me her number when I decided to make a trip to LA to do some business with a few record labels there (Century Media and Metal Blade). Renee graciously invited me to come over and I went there the evening after we landed in LA. We ultimately went to the Hard Rock to see Wayne Kramer (MC5) do a spoken word thing with some poet dude. It was a weird show but fun to meet Wayne and hang out. Before the show, we hung out at Renee’s for a bit and I got to speak to James Hong JamesHongon the phone for a minute as he was friends with Renee. One of the folks hanging out with us that night was John Skipp who wrote Fright Night! The dude was super cool. Anyway, that night and next morning were the only times I got to see Renee when I was there as my schedule was pretty tight with the record labels, but she made my trip that much better.

We spoke a few times since 1997 but not at all in the last 5-6 years. Thanks to social networking we’re in touch again and I’m happy about it. She was/is always the coolest. Now she’s doing movie reviews for The Examiner website. Renee has a very creative mind and I highly recommend that you check out her stuff.

Click here for Renee’s movie reviews, old and new.

Foodeater!

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I guess it was late 1987.  I went over to my friend Don’s house to see River’s Edge on HBO.  He had cable and I believe it was a Sunday night showing of the flick.   Unfortunately it was a 9PM showing and it was also a school night.  I only got to see the first hour of it because of my stupid curfew.

The main reason any of us wanted to see the movie is because we had read that Slayer and Fates Warning were in the soundtrack.  I finally got to see it in full about a year or 2 later when I found it for rent on VHS…or maybe I bought it.  I don’t quite remember.  I just remember watching it several times; both then and now.

This is in my top 5 or 10 movies of all time.  not only because of the soundtrack, but because of the movie itself.  Crispin Glover and Dennis Hopper have some great one-liners.  “I know, Feck.  You had to kill her.  Women are evil.”  “You…know this?” and the greatest line delivered by anyone in the flick was by *gasp* Keanu Reeves (worst actor ever?  maybe).  The scene (shown below) is between Matt and Jim (Matt’s mom’s boyfriend).  Really it’s the whole conversation, but when Matt replies to Jim calling him a “mother fucker” with “foodeater!”, it’s simply awesome.

But yeah, the whole movie rules.  I think I have watched it at least 50 times and watch it at least twice a year.  Really, Glover’s character makes this movie what it is and Hopper’s performance is right behind it.  Daniel Roebuck plays  a perfect role as someone who really doesn’t give a damn about anything.  The character of Tony has a great line too.  He’s getting interviewed by a reporter talking about how it’s hard to be subjective because he knew the perpetrator in question…then he stops and says, “Oh, by the way I play guitar.”  hahaha.  Awesome!

Glover has another great line when he’s asking for gas money for his baja VW…”What, do you think this car runs on God’s own methane?”

Here’s a list of quotes:  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0091860/quotes

If you’ve never seen it, please do so, especially if you were a metal kid of the 80s.

10/10