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Archive for March 2011

SxSW 2011 Quick Hits & Misses

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I’ll post reviews of some of my favorite happenings later, but here are some quick posts about some of this year’s SxSW happenings that I found.

  • Flatstock 29 – Flatstock is a poster art show where artists from all around showcase their wares andoffer them to the public for sale.  Since my first year of attending SxSW (2007), there has been a guy there named Brian Mercer who I think is an incredible artist and a helluva a nice dude.  I think I have bought a poster from him every year and got to see him away from the art show in a few clubs during the week.  I highly recommend his work, no matter if you’re a collector or you need some work done.  Check out his site:  Mercer Rock.  There were a lot of other good artists there but most made posters for bands I had no interest in.  Local artist Billy Perkins who sings for Butcherwhite was showing as well.  He has a current collection of works in process called “77”.  I picked up his Ace Frehely poster at FunFunFunFest a few months ago and this week picked up his Alice Cooper poster.  I love his style.  He also does band posters as needed.
  • Wednesday night I wanted to get into the Warbeast/Arson Anthem show at Emo’s.  The line was insanely long and none of the bands on the whole bill were really worth waiting that long for.  I can catch Warbeast again as they play Austin pretty regularly.
  • That same Wednesday I did get to catch Chicago’s Easy Action at the Ale House.  I had seen them a year or 2 prior and enjoy their brand of garage punk rock.  I met up with my friend Diane Kamikaze from WFMU.  We met last year at VoiVod and became fast friends.  She’s awesome and I’m glad I got to see her and her friend every day during the festival.
  • I did get to see quite a few bands throughout the week that just didn’t do a thing for me.  I won’t mention any by name but here’s a photo of one band from France that was pretty terrible except for their drummer.  The caption should read, “My shorts are more FuBu than yours!”  They were a ‘metal’ band, by the way.  Luckily most of the other bands on the bill saved the night.
  • People watching during SxSW is pretty interesting.  The influx of hipsters and gutter punks is crazy.  The hipsters seem to enjoy wearing vintage 80s “fashions” that really don’t fit.  I don’t know…most of what I see on them looked bad back in the 80s and still looks bad now.  I guess everyone’s got their thing, that just isn’t mine.  I’ll stick to my 80s looks of black t-shirt, blue jeans and black boots.   I at least wash my hair and bathe regularly.  It’s also cool meeting some of the foreigners who attend the festival.  After seeing the Bobby Liebling movie “Last Days Here“, I ran into some guys from Japan who were commenting on the patches on my jacket.  I told them I was seeing Loudness pretty soon and one of the guys pulls out his travel case with a 25th anniversary Loudness sticker on it.  He mentioned that their new drummer is a friend of his.  We had a quick discussion about Japanese metal and then parted ways.  The saw me again on the street the following night and handed me a CD of some J-Pop stuff.  Nice guys.
  • Street food/food trailers are a big thing in this town nowadays and even more so during the festivals.  Simms’ BBQ trailer at the corner of 7th and Red River is top notch in my book.  Their pulled-pork sandwich with pickles and onions really tastes like a McRib.  At least this is real pork.  Everything from this place is good.  The other usual suspects did me right as well like The Hot Dog King, Kebabalicious and Jackalope.  I did hit a veggie burger place yesterday that was pretty awful.  I hadn’t eaten since the previous day and there was no line there…I now know why!  I could not add enough pickles, spicy mustard and bbq sauce to drown out the nasty drabness of that burger.  Lesson learned.  Besides eating the street food, I am pretty sure I managed to lose some weight over the last few days.  I did tons of walking and my feet and knees are aching, but it’s a good thing.
  • Saturday morning I was able to catch The Rods at Cheapo Records at 11AM.  While I’ve never been a fan of them, I wanted to go see them for posterity’s sake and to get the book signed.  Mission accomplished.  Their set was lively and some of their true fans were there and that was great to see.  They were solid, I’m just not a big fan of their style of hard rock.  Their bassist, Gary Bordonaro was really good though.  I ended up seeing Gary and Carl Canedy on the street later that night as they were loading in for another gig downtown.  Apparently Wendy Dio was in attendance for that one!  Pretty cool.
  • I got to run into a few folks that I’ve wanted to meet for a while.  On Friday I ran into Wino from St Vitus at Scoot Inn and snapped a quick photo with him.  Dude’s a legend.  I didn’t make the Vitus show that night but heard it was good.  earlier that day I went to the D’Addario showcase and to see The Alex Skolnick Trio.  It was a fun show and Alex is a damned good player.  He was giving out free copies of his latest CD.  Repping for D’Addario was Frank Aresti from Fates Warning.  Oh man.  I’m a freak for early Fates Warning and especially the John Arch era.  A friend of Frank’s told me he was going to be there so when given an oppurtunity I chatted with him a bit, snapped a photo or 2 and got him to sign the book as well.  He told me a little about the upcoming album with John Arch and how John’s vocals still sound the same after 25 years.  I can’t wait for it to come out.  Before leaving I got to snap a show with both Alex and Frank.  That will be a moment cherished forever.
  • The Texas Guitar Show was pretty weak.  Much smaller than last year and I’m sure the economy has a lot to do with that.  Nobody was making deals either.  I did find one 80s Fender Jazz bass that I was interested in and he had it listed at or slightly above book value.  I offered a few hundred less and he said “all prices are what they are.”  Fine, I put my credit card back in my wallet and moved on.

All in all this has been a fun week.  I’m super tired, my feet and knees are killing me, I think my liver stopped working and I think I could go without seeing another band for a good week or 2…but I will make one more trip out this evening when Danava plays again.  They were my highlight of the festival along with spending time with Pentagram, both of which I will post about later.

Written by The Metal Files

March 20, 2011 at 1:42 pm

Movie Review: Last Days Here (The Story of Pentagram’s Bobby Liebling)

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Bobby Liebling is not a scary dude, but he’s been through some scary stuff.  One look at the scars on his arms and the age in his eyes and you know he’s been down some rough roads, left hand paths even.  Most people who have done meth, heroin and crack for as long as he has don’t survive.  Bobby Liebling is a survivor.

As noted in previous posts (here and here), I’ve been a Pentagram fan for 20+ years.   Finally getting to see them for the first time 2 years ago was a joy and last year’s encounter with them even better.

When I first saw that there was a documentary by 9.14 Pictures about Bobby being made and being world-premiered right here in Austin during the SxSW Festival, I was pretty excited.  Just last year I was fortunate enough to see the premier of the Lemmy movie.

I took off a few hours early for work to be able to attend the movie which was being shown at the Austin Convention Center at 4:30PM.  I go in and there are people everywhere.  The way admission works at these things is that if you have a Film Festival badge or wristband, you get automatic admission into events before those of us who choose not to purchase the credentials.  I never do.  I went to the ticket booth and they said “If there’s available seating it’ll cost $10 to see the movie.”  Sweet.  I think we paid $16 or less last year to see the Lemmy movie.

As I was waiting in the ticket purchase line, I see a long-haired dude in a leather jacket with some credentials hanging around his neck.  He was talking to someone in the next line over and I spot his name on his badge and see that he was one of the directors of the film, Demian Fenton.  He spots me and comes over and asks if I am there to see Last Days Here.  He complemented my Candlemass shirt, we spoke about the film and Pentagram for a few minutes and he left.  A few minutes later he comes back and hands me an 11” x 14” movie poster.  Awesome.

They start letting the badge holders and wristband wielders in then allow the ticket purchasers to buy a ticket and go in.   The theater was huge, bigger than I expected.  There were a few hundred seats on the floor and a few hundred more bleacher style seats.  I headed to top dead center of the bleacher seats.  My guess is that only about 75 people at the most were there.  I saw one guy in a Pentagram shirt and a few other people that I recognized from some shows around town.  Most people there were likely curious movie-goers.  Of course I feel that the turnout was pretty weak. Before the movie starts, the directors and producer were introduced and spoke for a few minutes.

The lights go down and the movie starts. The documentary begins in 2006 and you’re basically hit right off the bat seeing Bobby smoking crack.  It was painful to see.  His arms are bandaged up basically from wrist to should and his hands are swollen looking and black.  The crack and meth make him believe that he has bacteria on him that he has to pick off.  You get a long glimpse of his upper inner-bicep area where he has picked so much that it was just an open sore.  I’m not grossed out very easily but I did turn my head away from the screen for a moment.

You’re introduced to Sean “Pellet” Pelletier who was a huge Pentagram fan that basically became Bobby’s personal assistant, friend and tour manager.  You see his struggle in trying to help the band get things together to do some shows and you see the pain in his eyes from seeing his friend continually get messed up more and more from his drug use.

Bobby’s mom and dad and shown quite a bit as Bobby was living in their basement (The Sub-Basement) for much of his adult life.  His drug use has taken its toll on his parents as well.  His mom was still taking care of him, and really still enabling him.  You get a peek into what may have been a trigger for Bobby’s drug use when his dad speaks about how he wanted bigger and better things for his son (as most parents do).  His dad was apparently a pretty well-known Asst Secretary of State who worked for 3 or 4 presidents starting with Johnson.

It’s a pretty common theme for many drug users it seems.  A lot of pressure from parents to live up to their expectations and out of rebellion and maybe attention seeking, you become self-destructive…by choice.  No one forced those needles into Bobby nor did anyone force him to smoke crack.   I didn’t really get the feeling from the movie that he was being portrayed as a victim and I believe he even states that “I did this to myself.”

Later in the movie J.B. Beverley (“Like” him on Facebook) is shown quite a bit.  J.B.’s band used to play a bar that I worked in back in Virginia and when he was in town, he’d tell me whacked out stories about Bobby.  J.B. was portrayed as a good friend to Bobby in the movie.

There were some cool interviews with former members of the 70s era of the band as well as some good little segments with Joe Hasselvander and Victor Griffin.  There is some great classic footage and some of the modern footage from The Black Cat show where Bobby finally shows up with about 30 seconds left in the last song, gets kicked by the guitarist and the band walks off stage.  You also see the “comeback” footage from the 2009 Webster Hall show in NYC.

In the last few years, Bobby met a girl from Philadelphia who is about 30 years younger than him.  He moved up there from Maryland to live with her, he cleans up, looks good then things fell apart.  She left him, ended up filing a restraining order, he ends up in Jail for a few weeks etc.  Ultimately they get back together, get married and had a child together late in 2010 which is where the movie ends.  When I met Bobby last year, he seemed clean and was in very good spirits.  He seemed like a generally good natured guy who took terrible decisions.  (Review Your Choices, eh?)

Overall I think this was much better than the Lemmy movie as this really told a story.  The Lemmy movie really could’ve been titled “Hanging Out With Lemmy”, but it never really got too deep into the guy.  Last Days Here showed how drug abuse affects the user, the family and the friends.  Much of the sentiments in the movie hit “close to home” for me and there were several moments during the movie where I admittedly got choked up.  It may be a little more comparable to the Anvil movie, except this was about a better band.  They had several good chances for record deals via Colombia Records and even had Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley come down from NYC to check them out at a rehearsal, which eventually bombed.

After the movie there was a quick Q&A session and I caught up with the filmmakers in the hall to give them my thoughts and snap a quick photo with them.  They were all very gracious and I hope the 2 subsequent viewings this week go well, even better than yesterday’s.

As a Pentagram fan, I hope this movie ends up with some decent distribution.  This movie can also serve as a documentary about the damage caused by drug abuse.  I’d love to have this on DVD.  There was a full sized movie poster hanging in the hallway and I asked where I could purchase one.  Unfortunately only 2 were made so I’ll have to wait until they get some distribution before getting something like that.  I’d surely frame it and hang it up.  For now I’ll cherish the poster that they gave me and will hopefully catch one of the 2 shows that Pentagram are playing this week.

Nice work, guys.  Best of luck!

 

Bobby Liebling is not a scary dude, but he’s been through some scary stuff.  One look at the scars on his arms and the age in his eyes and you know he’s been down some rough roads, left hand paths even.  Most people who have done meth, heroin and crack for as long as he has don’t survive.  Bobby Liebling is a survivor.

As noted in previous posts (here and here), I’ve been a Pentagram fan for 20+ years.   Finally getting to see them for the first time 2 years ago was a joy and last year’s encounter with them even better.

When I first saw that there was a documentary about Bobby being made and being world-premiered right here in Austin during the SxSW Festival, I was pretty excited.  Just last year I was fortunate enough to see the premier of the Lemmy movie.

I took off a few hours early for work to be able to attend the movie which was being shown at the Austin Convention Center at 4:30PM.  I go in and there are people everywhere.  The way admission works at these things is that if you have a Film Festival badge or wristband, you get automatic admission into events before those of us who choose not to purchase the credentials.  I never do.  I went to the ticket booth and they said “If there’s available seating it’ll cost $10 to see the movie.”  Sweet.  I think we paid $16 or less last year to see the Lemmy movie.

As I was waiting in the ticket purchase line, I see a long-haired dude in a leather jacket with some credentials hanging around his neck.  He was talking to someone in the next line over and I spot his name on his badge and see that he was one of the directors of the film, Demian Fenton.  He spots me and comes over and asks if I am there to see Last Days Here.  He complemented my Candlemass shirt, we spoke about the film and Pentagram for a few minutes and he left.  A few minutes later he comes back and hands me an 11” x 14” movie poster.  Awesome.

They start letting the badge holders and wristband wielders in then allow the ticket purchasers to buy a ticket and go in.   The theater was huge, bigger than I expected.  There were a few hundred seats on the floor and a few hundred more bleacher style seats.  I headed to top dead center of the bleacher seats.  My guess is that only about 75 people at the most were there.  I saw one guy in a Pentagram shirt and a few other people that I recognized from some shows around town.  Most people there were likely curious movie-goers.  Of course I feel that the turnout was pretty weak. Before the movie starts, the directors and producer were introduced and spoke for a few minutes.

The lights go down and the movie starts. The documentary begins in 2006 and you’re basically hit right off the bat seeing Bobby smoking crack.  It was painful to see.  His arms are bandaged up basically from wrist to should and his hands are swollen looking and black.  The crack and meth make him believe that he has bacteria on him that he has to pick off.  You get a long glimpse of his upper inner-bicep area where he has picked so much that it was just an open sore.  I’m not grossed out very easily but I did turn my head away from the screen for a moment.

You’re introduced to Sean “Pellet” Pelletier who was a huge Pentagram fan that basically became Bobby’s personal assistant, friend and tour manager.  You see his struggle in trying to help the band get things together to do some shows and you see the pain in his eyes from seeing his friend continually get messed up more and more from his drug use.

Bobby’s mom and dad and shown quite a bit as Bobby was living in their basement (The Sub-Basement) for much of his adult life.  His drug use has taken its toll on his parents as well.  His mom was still taking care of him, and really still enabling him.  You get a peek into what may have been a trigger for Bobby’s drug use when his dad speaks about how he wanted bigger and better things for his son (as most parents do).  His dad was apparently a pretty well-known Asst Secretary of State who worked for 3 or 4 presidents starting with Johnson.

It’s a pretty common theme for many drug users it seems.  A lot of pressure from parents to live up to their expectations and out of rebellion and maybe attention seeking, you become self-destructive…by choice.  No one forced those needles into Bobby nor did anyone force him to smoke crack.   I didn’t really get the feeling from the movie that he was being portrayed as a victim and I believe he even states that “I did this to myself.”

Later in the movie J.B. Beverley is shown quite a bit.  J.B.’s band used to play a bar that I worked in back in Virginia and when he was in town, he’d tell me whacked out stories about Bobby.  J.B. was portrayed as a good friend to Bobby in the movie.

There were some cool interviews with former members of the 70s era of the band as well as some good little segments with Joe Hasselvander and Victor Griffin.  There is some great classic footage and some of the modern footage from The Black Cat show where Bobby finally shows up with about 30 seconds left in the last song, gets kicked by the guitarist and the band walks off stage.  You also see the “comeback” footage from the 2009 Webster Hall show in NYC.

In the last few years, Bobby met a girl from Philadelphia who is about 30 years younger than him.  He moved up there from Maryland to live with her, he cleans up, looks good then things fell apart.  She left him, ended up filing a restraining order, he ends up in Jail for a few weeks etc.  Ultimately they get back together, get married and had a child together late in 2010 which is where the movie ends.  When I met Bobby last year, he seemed clean and was in very good spirits.  He seemed like a generally good natured guy who took terrible decisions.  (Review Your Choices, eh?)

Overall I think this was much better than the Lemmy movie as this really told a story.  The Lemmy movie really could’ve been titled “Hanging Out With Lemmy”, but it never really got too deep into the guy.  Last Days Here showed how drug abuse affects the user, the family and the friends.  Much of the sentiments in the movie hit “close to home” for me and there were several moments during the movie where I admittedly got choked up.  It may be a little more comparable to the Anvil movie, except this was about a better band.  They had several good chances for record deals via Colombia Records and even had Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley come down from NYC to check them out at a rehearsal, which eventually bombed.

After the movie there was a quick Q&A session and I caught up with the filmmakers in the hall to give them my thoughts and snap a quick photo with them.  They were all very gracious and I hope the 2 subsequent viewings this week go well, even better than yesterday’s.

As a Pentagram fan, I hope this movie ends up with some decent distribution.  I’d love to have this on DVD.  There was a full sized movie poster hanging in the hallway and I asked where I could purchase one.  Unfortunately only 2 were made so I’ll have to wait until they get some distribution before getting something like that.  I’d surely frame it and hang it up.  For now I’ll cherish the poster that they gave me and will hopefully catch one of the 2 shows that Pentagram are playing this week.

Nice work, guys.  Best of luck!

Motörhead Concert Review March 8, 2011 – Motörhead Day!

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We are Motörhead and we don’t have no class!

As many of my lovely readers may have heard from my previous post or via Blabbermouth, yesterday (March 8, 2011) was declared Motörhead Day in Austin, TX by our mayor.  Read yesterday’s post to get the precursor for this one.

I got off work and rushed home to get things together for potentially meeting Motörhead before their show.  I’m waiting on Dave and his son in front of Stubb’s and see awesome photog Jay West.  I tell him what’s going on and said I’d try to get him back there with us to get a photo of those guys with the Motörhead Day Proclamation (click for photo).  Dave and his son walk up and I send a message to my pal who works security for Motörhead.  He finds us outside and escorts to the “backstage” area of Stubb’s where Lemmy, Mikkey and some of the crew were hanging out.  This was right after their soundcheck.

Lemmy’s sitting at the door flipping through a food magazine and Mikkey stands up to greet us.  Phil was nowhere to be found, unfortunately.  Mikkey reads it then Dave tells me to give it to Lemmy for a read.  I explained what it was and he sat and read the whole thing.  He stood up and said something like, “This is neat.  I love playing Austin.  Thank you very much”  We shake hands and Jay snaps a few quick photos.  I mentioned to Lemmy about meeting him after the movie premier last year and mentioned my Another Perfect Day tattoo backpiece.  He said, “Ah yes, I told you that you should have picked a better album, right?”  haha.  “Yes sir, you did.”  Lemmy seemed tired and later that evening during the set, Phil mentioned on mic that he wasn’t feeling well, so Phil did much of the talking between songs.  Also, if you’ve seen the movie, read interviews or ever met Lemmy, he’s pretty much indifferent about stuff like this, but it was great that he and Mikkey allowed us to come back for a few minutes and share our joy with them.  Added bonus for me was getting Lemmy and Mikkey’s signatures in my book.  FINALLY!

So that was that.  Mikkey gave Dave’s son, Kameron, a can of Coca-Cola as we were leaving and he says, “I’m never opening this can…ever.”  Awesome.   I understand that sentiment as I still have an unopened bottle Heineken that Nicko McBrain signed for me in 1988.

Good times.  All of us were elated after this.  It was fun and glad that it all worked out for all of us.  I ran the book home and went to dinner with some friends.  I had no interest in seeing Valient Thorr again or in seeing Clutch.  I got back to the venue with about 4 Clutch songs left.  BORING.  I hadn’t listened to them in years and remembered why last night.  Oh well.  It was Motörhead Day and all I cared about was seeing Lemmy and the boys tear it up like they always do.

They hit the stage right at 9PM.  Lemmy opens by saying, “We’re Motörhead…and we play rock and roll.”  Then they go

Photo by Jay West

right into a great version of We Are Motörhead.  Great song to open with!  The band was tight throughout the whole show.  Phil was more animated than I had seen in the last few shows.  Lemmy’s tone and playing were awesome.  He’s very unique.  If you’ve seen the Lemmy movie DVD there’s a bonus section in there about how he plays his bass.  He’s usually playing power chords and it just gives his sound that much more grind.  At 60+, the man can still kick ass.  His voice sounded better than last year as well.  Then there’s Mikkey.  All you see is hair and hands and cymbals moving.  He was awesome as always.  Easily in my top 5 drummers of all time.  Motörhead rules live, period.

The highlight of their set for me was I Got Mine.  It’s from my favorite Motörhead album and it’s just a great song.  Of course they closed the main part of their set with Ace of Spades and Overkill was the encore.

Metal Dave from 2Fast2Die said before they went on, “What a crusty looking crowd.”  Definitely.  Motörhead draws folks from a lot of different crowds.  They are also one of the bands where it seems to be ok to wear their shirts when you go see them live.  It’s always been stated (right or wrong, silly really) that you shouldn’t wear the shirt for the band you are going to see.  Motörhead and Maiden seem to be exceptions to that rule.  I saw some nice vintage shirts there as well.

It was a great show and I’m glad it sold out.  Lem’s not getting any younger and no telling when his juice is going to run out…hopefully never!  Go see this tour!

There was one major thing missing…Their front of house sound engineer Hobbs! Where was he?  Talk about a crusty old bastard.  He rules!

Setlist as I remember it and a bit out of order:

  1. We Are Motörhead
  2. Stay Clean
  3. Get Back In Line
  4. Metropolis
  5. I Got Mine
  6. Over The Top
  7. The Chase Is Better Than The Catch
  8. Rock Out
  9. I Know How to Die
  10. In The Name of Tragedy
  11. Just Cos You Got The Power
  12. Killed By Death
  13. Going To Brazil
  14. Ace of Spades
  15. Overkill

All photos below by Jay West Photography.  Click to enlarge.

Kameron, Dave, Lemmy, me, Mikkey (holding Motorhead Day Proclamation)

Phil and Lemmy

Lemmy and his signature Rickenbacker 4004LK Bass.

Lemmy

Phil Campbell

Written by The Metal Files

March 9, 2011 at 1:24 pm

Happy Motorhead Day Austin, Tx! March 8, 2011

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A week or so ago Dave S. told me that he had asked an Austin City Council member to see if they’d be open to doing a proclamation of some sort Motorhead Day proclamation from the City of Austin Mayorfor Motorhead, who is playing Stubb’s BBQ March 8, 2011 (tonight!).  What a great idea!  I didn’t know if the Mayor of “The Live Music Capital of the World” would go for it, but apparently he did.  A gave a proclamation that March 8, 2011 is Motorhead Day in Austin.  How cool is that?

This city is probably the only one I could think of in the States that would do something like this.  It does show that they do care a little bit about keeping the music going here, even though they seem to try and find ways to keep it down.

Once Dave had let me know that everything was a go, he sent a copy of the proclamation and I sent it in to Blabbermouth who posted it pretty quickly after getting some confirmation that it was real.  I worked for a while yesterday evening to figure out just how Dave (and I!) were going to be able to present this to the band and after last night’s encounter with Mikkey Dee downtown, it looks like we can make it happen.

It was great spending a few minutes with him again.  I spoke to him for 5 seconds last year at the premier of the Lemmy movie but have hung out with him in years past (twice with Motorhead 92 & 2000) and once with Dokken in 1991.  He’s always a super cool and we talked about some of his past adventures with Dokken where he said, “We were so awful.”  I disagreed.  I had always assumed that he was on the Geisha album “Phantasmagoria” but he said he’d left to join King Diamond prior to the recording.  I had mentioned that his joining Motorhead was the reason I ever decided to give their music a chance.  he smiled and said, “Me too!”  It gave us a good chuckle.  We snapped a quick photo and he was off to another place to see some music and I needed to get home and go to bed.

Lemmy loves Austin and anytime he goes on the road in the US, he always seems to make a stop here.  That’s great for us!  Tonight is the show with Clutch and Valient Thorr.  It’ll be great to see Motorhead live again, they never disappoint.  I’ll get a review of the show up ASAP and hopefully will also have a story about delivering the proclamation to the band.

Me and Mikkey Dee

Written by The Metal Files

March 8, 2011 at 8:48 am

Colin Hay Concert Review 03/01/2011

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This was my second time seeing Colin Hay doing his solo acoustic show and it was great.  You can read about past experiences with Colin and men At Work here.

The show was at the One World Theatre. This place is one of the best places to see a band that I have ever been to.  It’s small (maybe 250 seats) and acoustically perfect.  It’s in the Texas Hill Country and it’s got a gorgeous setting.

Opening the show was a guy named Chris Trapper (His Wikipedia page here).  He wasn’t bad at all.  Apparently he wrote a song on the Autumn Rush soundtrack.  He had a few good jokes, played about 6 or 7 songs and was gone.

Colin comes on stage to a standing ovation, straps on his Maton acoustic, tunes it and goes right into Men At Work’s Down Under.  After this song he starts his joking and storytelling.  He hadn’t gotten to the second song yet and says, “Maybe we’ll get 4 or 5 songs in tonight.”  If you’ve seen him before, you know he likes to talk, a lot.  It’s part of his show and he’s really an interesting guy.

He ended up playing 9 songs, a few of which I don’t think I had heard before.  Of the 9, three were men At work songs:  Down Under, Who Can It Be Now?, and Overkill.  I saw that he had added Blue For You to a few shows last year and I really hoped we would have heard that one last night, but no dice.  Didn’t matter.  He sounded great.  His voice is still strong and he’s a really good guitar player as well.

During the closer, Overkill, he used a memory man pedal to record the main riff of the song during the song and actually got to play the guitar solo.  He didn’t do that last time and it was pretty cool.  I love that song.

After the show, he did a meet and greet.  Lots of people there buying his new CD which was just released that day.  Lots of folks had Men At Work stuff.  One girl was wearing a vintage Cargo Tour shirt, which was pretty cool.  I got through the line, just shook his hand, told him it was a great show and that I had seen him a few times before.  I mentioned the solo show in 2009 and Men At Work in 1999.  We snapped a quick photo and I was on my merry way.  He looked pretty tired, but he was smiling.

If you get a chance to see this tour, do it.

Setlist (only songs 1,2,3 and 9 are in proper order):

  1. Down Under
  2. Wayfaring Sons
  3. Who Can It Be Now?
  4. Prison Time
  5. Beautiful World
  6. I just don’t think I’ll ever get over you
  7. Waiting for my real life to begin
  8. Maggie
  9. Overkill

Written by The Metal Files

March 2, 2011 at 8:14 am